Valldemossa is one of the prettiest villages in Mallorca. It's situation in the hills of the Tramuntana range, at about 17 km from Palma makes Valldemossa an extraordinary day out and is a wonderful cultural visit. Surrounded by forested hills and lush countryside, it's also a favourite with outdoor enthusiasts.

 

With a population of around 2,000, Valldemossa is a quiet and traditional town with narrow streets and lanes constructed with blonde stone, as are the houses. Each doorway and street is lined with beautiful green plants and flowers making the town one of the most beautiful in Mallorca.

Turkish cuisine  is largely the heritage of Ottoman cuisine, which can be described as a fusion and refinement of Central Asian, Caucasian, Middle Eastern, Mediterranean and Balkan cuisines.[1][2] Turkish cuisine has in turn influenced those and other neighbouring cuisines, including those of Western Europe. The Ottomans fused various culinary traditions of their realm with influences from Middle Eastern cuisines, along with traditional Turkic elements from Central Asia (such as yogurt and mantı), creating a vast array of specialities—many with strong regional associations.

 

Turkish cuisine varies across the country. The cooking of Istanbul, Bursa, Izmir, and rest of the Aegean region inherits many elements of Ottoman court cuisine, with a lighter use of spices, a preference for rice over bulgur, koftes and a wider availability of vegetables stew (türlü), eggplant, stuffed dolmas and fish. The cuisine of the Black Sea Region uses fish extensively, especially the Black Sea anchovy (hamsi) and includes maize dishes. The cuisine of the southeast -Urfa, Gaziantep and Adana- is famous for its variety of kebabs, mezes and dough-based desserts such as baklava, kadayıf and künefe.